Limited Wish (Impossible Times #2) by Mark Lawrence | Paradoxes and some more D&D campaigns!

A good mathematical proof is a gem. It sparkles in the same way, and like a diamond, it’s impervious to time. It takes and multiplies the light of understanding, refracting it through many facets.

Limited Wish by Mark Lawrence

I’m so glad that I had an opportunity to read the two books in the Impossible Times trilogy back to back. «One Word Kill» was an amazing “introduction” of the time traveling concept and the main characters, but «Limited Wish» brought the story to the next level, introducing even more dark and twisted moments.

You can read my review of «One Word Kill» here, but I will try to stay away from the spoilers and give a quick overview of improvements and things I enjoyed the most about the second book in this new Sci-Fi trilogy by Mark Lawrence.


goodreads blurb:

One choice. Two possible timelines. And a world hanging in the balance.

It’s the summer of 1986 and reluctant prodigy Nick Hayes is a student at Cambridge University, working with world-renowned mathematician Professor Halligan. He just wants to be a regular student, but regular isn’t really an option for a boy-genius cancer survivor who’s already dabbled in time travel.

When he crosses paths with a mysterious yet curiously familiar girl, Nick discovers that creases have appeared in the fabric of time, and that he is at the centre of the disruption. Only Nick can resolve this time paradox before the damage becomes catastrophic for both him and the future of the world. Time is running out—literally.

GOODREADS  | AMAZON UK – US |  BOOKDEPOSITORY  | AUTHOR’S WEBSITE

Thank you Netgalley and 47North (Amazon Publishing UK) for a free ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions expressed herein are my own and not influenced by the company or its affiliates in any way.


The boy-genius Nick Heyes has a big task ahead of him, and to make that future possible he needs to hurry up, even if that means doing everything in his power to enter Cambridge University and work with one of the most famous mathematicians of his time.  

WHAT I LIKED:

1 – I feel like this trilogy needs to become required reading for math lessons. Not to learn math, but to inspire children and create a positive association with mathematics.

I was always good at maths but it wasn’t until I started to take the stuff seriously that I began to see the beauty of it.

Limited Wish by Mark Lawrence

I can already imagine how many young boys and girls would strive to be like Nick Heyes, especially when it comes to time traveling. Oh, and of course there will be even more who’d LOVE to play Dungeons & Dragons.

2My favorite character from the first book – Simon, the nerdy, antisocial guy, also gets some love in the 2nd book! I loved seeing his interventions in the story, however, I’m not a fan that he’s becoming more like his D&D character, and slowly learning the tricks of manipulation!

Sam, the new member of the D&D party, provoked a lot of new emotions from the rest of the group. I was surprised to see Simon accept him so quickly, but watching them headbutting during the games was very amusing.

3 – If «One Word Kill» was «Time Traveling for Dummies. Vol 1», «Limited Wish» felt more like a school manual on all things science (with a lot of paradoxes!). Don’t let this scare you off, though! Because as always, Mark Lawrence’s clever and beautiful writing style makes everything appealing, even maths!


My rating:
★★★★★

HAVE YOU READ ANY BOOKS BY MARK LAWRENCE?LET ME KNOW IN THE COMMENTS DOWN BELOW!

OTHER BOOKS BY MARK LAWRENCE:



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6 thoughts on “Limited Wish (Impossible Times #2) by Mark Lawrence | Paradoxes and some more D&D campaigns!

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