Fragments of the Lost by Megan Miranda | A perfect YA thriller for darker evenings!

I loved this book! Simple as that. It was such a gripping, dark thriller. Absolutely perfect for Autumn and Halloween. This was my first book by Megan Miranda, but I will definitely pay much more attention to her books from now.  If you have any recommendations, make sure to leave them in the comments below. Continue reading “Fragments of the Lost by Megan Miranda | A perfect YA thriller for darker evenings!”

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Artemis by Andy Weir | 5 Reasons why I disliked Jazz Bashara

Andy Weir’s «The Martian» was a real boom, especially after the movie starring Matt Damon. I admit that I only learned about the book after hearing so much hype around the movie. The novel was astounding! Emotional, yet incredibly witty. Mark Watney was a delight of a character to follow. Science, jokes, life threatening crises – it had everything!

It was very difficult to not compare «Artemis» to «The Martian», and I must say that this new book was not as good as the previous one. Still very entertaining and full of science, but something was missing. Continue reading “Artemis by Andy Weir | 5 Reasons why I disliked Jazz Bashara”

Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi | An astounding tale that sweeps through generations

It is undeniable that «Homegoing» must be included in school literature program! Yaa Gyasi created the most emotional novel. It all started with two half sisters, Effia and Esi, in XVIII century Ghana and then followed generation after generation until our days, and saw the true power of family, of the past, of history.

I would not be lying if I said that I’ve never read anything more beautiful, heart-wracking and touching. She was able to grip my heart and shatter it times and times again, as every new generation went through a series of struggles, poised by the historical settings at that particular time. Continue reading “Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi | An astounding tale that sweeps through generations”

Weycombe by G.M. Malliet | The importance of cohesive fact introduction

I’m not an author and I’m not trying to be one, so it’s very difficult for me to criticise books on the styles they were written in. But, ultimately, I am the audience. I read the blurb, I liked it, I was intrigued by it and decided to dedicate my time to reading a particular novel. And there are often times when the writing style or certain writing quirks don’t work for me as well as they do for others, and I find it my duty to share these moments with you!

«Weycombe» is similar one of those cozy, detective movies set in a small town in a middle of nowhere. The community is so tiny, everyone knows each other and such strong events as murder usually reveals a whole lot more gossip than we expected! Continue reading “Weycombe by G.M. Malliet | The importance of cohesive fact introduction”

Nyxia by Scott Reintgen | Simply one of the best Sci-fis I’ve ever read!

That is correct! I read what turned out to be one of the best Sci-fi books I’ve ever had a chance to get my hands on! Even though I read this back in June of this year (Thank you NetGalley and Crown Books for the ARC!), I still cannot stop thinking about it. Continue reading “Nyxia by Scott Reintgen | Simply one of the best Sci-fis I’ve ever read!”

Sing, Unburied, Sing by Jesmyn Ward | When multiple PoVs ruin the reading experience

Whenever I cannot figure out how to start a review, I browse GoodReads reviews for some inspiration. My opinion on the book is already set in stone and there is no risk to get influenced by other people’s thoughts. However, sometimes it turns out to be far from the best idea.

The majority of reviews for «Sing, Unburied, Sing» are all very positive, 5-star ratings and tons of praises. This made me a little bit apprehensive about my own feedback. But fear not! As I actually have some solid reasons behind my relatively low rating! Continue reading “Sing, Unburied, Sing by Jesmyn Ward | When multiple PoVs ruin the reading experience”

Things a Bright Girl Can Do by Sally Nicholls | A must-read YA, introducing the suffragette movement to the younger generation

«’It isn’t just about me,’ she said. ‘It’s about us all! All women! How can women live like this? How can women like Mother just go on – not caring?’»

You know how sometimes we read this, seemingly an amazing, book. It covers so many meaningful subjects; has great characters and plot, but for some reasons you are just not feeling it. I’m not sure if that happened to you before, but it certainly is a rare occurance for me and makes my “blogging” life so much more complicated!

I will try to dissect my feelings as thoroughly as possible and maybe we can actually find a reason behind my “low enjoyment level” for this novel. Continue reading “Things a Bright Girl Can Do by Sally Nicholls | A must-read YA, introducing the suffragette movement to the younger generation”

My rating system | Does it really work?

This is a very long-coming post. Usually, when people start a book blog, rating protocol is one of the first things they think about. Afterall, that is what you will be doing for the most part of the blog – reviewing and rating books. On almost every blog you can find the rating system and its explanation to help people situate themselves within the wide array of stars, roses, tea cups and other symbols picked by thousands of book bloggers.

It took me over a year to figure out what exactly I want my ratings to represent. Continue reading “My rating system | Does it really work?”